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Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Neo-socialism and inter-war fascism found in the catalog.

Neo-socialism and inter-war fascism

Steve Bastow

Neo-socialism and inter-war fascism

a critique of the approaches.

by Steve Bastow

  • 348 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Kingston University, European Research Centre .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesDiscussion paper / Kingston University, European Research Centre -- 95/3
ContributionsKingston University. European Research Centre.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19089779M

  "Marxists in the Face of Fascism, with a very useful introduction by David Beetham, is an unrivaled and vital piece, allowing us to grasp the major contribution of inter-war Marxism, in its great diversity of theoretical approaches and political orientations, and to deepening our understanding of fascism and to antifascist practice"—Ugo Reviews: 3. Get this from a library! Clerical fascism in interwar Europe. [Matthew Feldman; Marius Turda; Tudor Georgescu;] -- "This edited volume arose from an international workshop convened in by Feldman and Turda with Tudor Georgescu, supported by Routledge, and the universities of Oxford, Brookes, Northampton and.

A well-researched book, “Intellectuals and Fascism in Interwar Romania” follows the political movements of the th in Romania, focusing on the Young Generation and the Criterion Association. Bejan tackles difficult questions and controversies, looking for Reviews: 8.   : Liberalism, Fascism, or Social Democracy: Social Classes and the Political Origins of Regimes in Interwar Europe (): Luebbert, Gregory M.: Books.

This edited volume arose from an international workshop convened in by Feldman and Turda with Tudor Georgescu, supported by Routledge, and the universities of Oxford, Brookes, Northampton and CEU (Budapest). As the field of fascist studies continues to integrate more fully into pan-European stu.   It is virtually impossible (outside certain parts of the Right-wing itself) to try to understand the resurgent Right without hearing it described as – or compared with – 20th-century interwar fascism. Like fascism, the resurgent Right is irrational, close-minded, violent and racist. So goes the analogy, and there’s truth to it.


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Neo-socialism and inter-war fascism by Steve Bastow Download PDF EPUB FB2

According to authors Roland Sarti and Rosario Neo-socialism and inter-war fascism book, “[U]nder Fascism the state had more latitude for control of the economy than any other nation at the time except for the Soviet Union.” 8 Interestingly, Mussolini found much of John Maynard Keynes’s economic theories consistent with fascism, writing: “Fascism entirely agrees with Mr.

Griffin principally examines interwar Italian Fascism and German National Socialism, with political and historiographical analysis by contemporary and post-war liberals, Marxists, and conservatives.

There are selections in the book, most of them from prePublisher: Oxford University Press. WELCOME TO FRIENDLY!!. What are you looking for Book "Clerical Fascism In Interwar Europe"?Click "Read Now PDF" / "Download", Get it for FREE, Register % Easily.

You can read all your books for as long as a month for FREE and will get the latest Books Notifications. In a time when many interwar ideas seem to have rematerialized, this book could not be more necessary or timely.” (Marius Turda, author of Modernism and Eugenics and co-author of Historicizing Race) “Bejan’s meticulous study joins a handful of books that recognize that the quest for a dynamic new modernity animated both modernism and : Palgrave Macmillan.

But fascism dominated only in Europe, where it was set inside a single large geographical bloc of authoritarian regimes. Since Europe elsewhere remained liberal democratic, there were “two Europes.” The period of fascism's explosive growth was also rent Author: Michael Mann.

There have also been at least three major works focussing on anti-fascism: Nigel Copsey’s syncretic history of anti-fascism in Britain between c and c, my own studies of anti-fascism in andand now an important new collection edited by Copsey and Olechnowicz, to which I.

Economics During the Inter-War Years () The League of Nations () Attempts at Reconciliation and Disarmament () The Soviet Union During the Inter-War Years () Eastern Europe During the Inter-War Years () Italian Fascism during the Inter-War Years () Britain During the Inter-War Years ().

The concept of a “far left” that is opposed to a “far right” is false. The systems placed on the two ends of that spectrum, including socialism, fascism, and Nazism, are all rooted in. This book explores, from a transnational viewpoint, the historical relationship between war veterans and fascism in interwar Europe.

Until now, historians have been roughly divided between those who assume that 'brutalization' (George L. Mosse) led veterans to join fascist movements and those who stress that most ex-soldiers of the Great War became committed pacifists and internationalists.

“When Americans think of dictators they always think of some foreign model,” wrote the anti-fascist journalist Dorothy Thompson in the mids, but an American dictator would be “one of the boys, and he will stand for everything traditionally American.” And the American people, Thompson added, “will greet him with one great big, universal, democratic, sheeplike bleat of ‘O.K., Chief.

Neo-fascism is a post–World War II ideology that includes significant elements of -fascism usually includes ultranationalism, racial supremacy, populism, authoritarianism, nativism, xenophobia and opposition to immigration, as well as opposition to liberal democracy, parliamentarianism, capitalism, liberalism, Marxism, communism, and socialism.

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection. War Veterans and Fascism in Interwar Europe.

Ángel Alcalde; Online ISBN: Your name * Please enter your name. Your email address * Please enter a valid email address. Fascism and Genocide in Inter-War Europe (Routledge Studies in Modern History) Aristotle A. Kallis This book investigates how fascism – as an ideology and political praxis – reconfigured the ideological, political, and moral landscape of interwar Europe, generating an atmosphere of extreme ‘license’ that facilitated the leap into.

This book explores, from a transnational viewpoint, the historical relationship between war veterans and fascism in interwar Europe. Until now, historians have been roughly divided between those who assume that ‘brutalization’ (George L.

Mosse) led. The early essays identify certain elements of British fascism, particularly anti-semitism, which produced the ideology of the inter-war organisations calling themselves ‘fascist’. Stress is laid on the British roots rather than the European influences of Italy or Germany, and the book also considers the Imperial Fascist League, a competitor.

On Jonah's first three points, "neo-socialism" would seem virtually indistinguishable from the original Mussolini-style fascism that was so favored by American and European intellectualoids in the late Twenties and early Thirties. Only point four is significantly different, since Mussolini was a "nationalist" who certainly didn't share the.

This book explores, from a transnational viewpoint, the historical relationship between war veterans and fascism in interwar Europe. Until now, historians have been roughly divided between those who assume that 'brutalization' (George L.

Mosse) led veterans to join fascist movements and those who stress that most ex-soldiers of the Great War became committed pacifists and : Ángel Alcalde. Fascism first takes root when politicians conjure up a faith in a mythic past — a past supposedly destroyed by liberals, feminists and immigrants.

For Mussolini, it. Amid the chaos of the early inter-war years, Benito Mussolini founded the Fascist Party, the Fascio di Combattimento, in March The Fascist Party, composed largely of war veterans, was vehemently anti-communist, and advocated the glorification of war.

This edited volume arose from an international workshop convened in by Feldman and Turda with Tudor Georgescu, supported by Routledge, and the universities of Oxford, Brookes, Northampton and CEU (Budapest). As the field of fascist studies continues to integrate more fully into pan-European studies of the twentieth century, and given the increasing importance of secular ‘political.

The book as a whole is divided into sections covering Italian Fascism, German fascism (including non-Nazi fascist thinkers), abortive fascisms from the inter-war period (including non-European fascist movements), interpretations of fascism (Marxist as well as non-Marxist theories), and finally a section on contemporary fascism which brings the Reviews:   Clerical Fascism in Interwar Europe book.

Clerical Fascism in Interwar Europe. DOI link for Clerical Fascism in Interwar Europe. Clerical Fascism in Interwar Europe book. Edited By Matthew Feldman, Marius Turda, Tudor Georgescu. Edition 1st Edition. First Published eBook Published 31 October Fascism - Fascism - Neofascism: Although fascism was largely discredited in Europe at the end of World War II, fascist-inspired movements were founded in several European countries beginning in the late s.

Similar groups were created outside Europe as well, primarily in Latin America, the Middle East, and South Africa. Like their fascist predecessors, the “neofascists” advocated.