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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of simple index of stand density for Douglas-fir found in the catalog.

simple index of stand density for Douglas-fir

Robert O. Curtis

simple index of stand density for Douglas-fir

by Robert O. Curtis

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  • 40 Currently reading

Published by USDA Forest Service] in [Portland, Or.? .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir.,
  • Plant competition.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementRobert O. Curtis.
    ContributionsUnited States. Forest Service.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. 92-94 ;
    Number of Pages94
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15331052M

    Keywords: Douglas-fir, nondestructive, MOE, prediction, soil, stand, least limiting water range (LLWR). INTRODUCTION Small-diameter Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) trees are often available from thinning operations in overstocked stands in the Interior Northwest. Douglas-fir can occupy a greater variety of habitats than any. It was found that the distribution of the leaf inclination angle of a Douglas-fir canopy has strong planophile characteristics, and that in the case of a forest stand on a slope, it is critical to.

    Douglas-fir is not a true fir at all, nor a pine or spruce. It is a distinct species named after its discoverer Archibald Menzies and a botanist, David Douglas. A major characteristic that distinguishes it from true firs is its cone which falls from the tree intact. Douglas-fir is . 1st Static SDMD in NA - - Pacific NW - Douglas Fir (A) Principal Relationships of the DF SDMD Approximate crown closure line Pr of isoline representing the size-density condition at which maximum stand production is achieved Lower limit of the zone of imminent competition-mortality Maximum size-density relationship (-3/2.

    Stand Density Index B y David R. Larsen Stand density index (SDI) is a relative measure of stand density the converts a stand's current density into a density at a reference size. Stand density index w as present by Reineke () and can be defined as: where SDI is Stand Density index, Dq is the quadratic mean diameter. Limited tree size variation in Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) plantations in coastal Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia makes them susceptible to developing high height to diameter ratios (H/D) in the dominant trees. The H/D of a tree is a relative measure of stability under wind and snow loads. Experimental plot data from three large studies were used to evaluate the impact of.


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Simple index of stand density for Douglas-fir by Robert O. Curtis Download PDF EPUB FB2

A simple index of stand density for Douglas-fir. Author: Curtis, Robert O. Created Date: Z. Get this from a library. A simple index of stand density for Douglas-fir. [Robert O Curtis; United States. Forest Service.].

ESRM (E. Turnblom) – Stand Density Measures p. 10 of 10 LITERATURE CITED Curtis, R.O. A simple index of stand density for Douglas-fir. For. Sci. 92 – Flewelling, J.W. Stand density management: An alternative approach and its application to Douglas-fir. A more rigorous evaluation of the maximum stand density frontier for Douglas-fir and grand fir using the year data set illustrates four important points.

First, previously published maximum stand density curves (solid line) are excellent estimators of simple index of stand density for Douglas-fir book density maxima observed in the overall yr by: 1.

Douglas-fir Plantations T. JOHN DREW JAMES W. FLEWELLING ABSTRACT. A method of viewing stand density as it relates to volume production and tree size is developed in the form of a simple density management diagram applicable to plantations of coastal Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga rnenziesii (Mirb.) Franco, on all sites.

Three prominent points. Stand Density Index. Stand density index (SDI) is a relative measure of stand desnity the converts a stand's current density into a density at a reference size. Stand density index was present by Reineke () and can be defined as: where SDI is Stand Density index, D q is the quadratic mean diameter.

Quadratic mean diameter is the diameter of. Curtis, R.O. A simple index of stand density for Douglas-fir. Forest Science Dean, T.J. and V.C. Baldwin. Using a density-management diagram to develop thinning schedules for loblolly pine plantations.

USDA Forest Service Research Paper SO, 7p. Journal of Forestry. ; Curtis. Robert O. Stand density measures: An interpretation. Forest Sci- ence. Curtis, Robert O. A tree area power function and related stand density measures for Douglas-fir. Forest Science. Curtis, Robert O. A simple index of stand density for Douglas-fir.

The site index and height growth curves presented here are for Douglas-fir in pure or mixed, even-aged, managed stands where relatively low density, lack ofa~e. of vege­ tatlve competltlon early in the life of the stand permit full height development.

A managed stand is being manipulated toward some goal. A simple index of stand density for Douglas-fir. For. Sci. Google Scholar. Edmonds RL, Hsiang T. Forest floor and soil influence on response of Douglas-fir to urea.

FIGURE 4.—Maxima curves for: A, Mixed conifer stands in California; B, Douglas fir in Wash- ington and Oregon; C, Douglas fir in northern California. Note that the maximum stand- density index is almost identical (approximately ) for both groups of Douglas fir Where random sampling is secured, as in strip cruises, fitting.

Prediction of Douglas-fir fertilizer response using biogeoclimatic properties in the coastal Pacific Northwest K.M. Littke, a R.B. Harrison, a D. Zabowski, a M.A. Ciol, b D.G. Briggs a * a University of Washington, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, Box The purpose of a “forest stand density guide” is to give such a schedule.

A “stand” is defined as a contiguous group of trees sufficiently uniform in species composition (including mixed stands), age and condition to be a homogenous and distinguishable unit.

The FOREST STAND DENSITY GUIDE, Table 1, gives the optimum stand densities by. Curtis RO () A simple index of stand density for Douglas-fir. For Sci –94 Google Scholar Curtis RO () Effect of diameter limits and stand structure on relative density indices: a case study.

When used as a measure of relative density, Reineke’s stand density index (SDI) can be made unitless by relating the current SDI to a standard density but when used as a quantitative measure of stand density SDI is not unitless. Reineke’s SDI relates the current stand density to an equivalent number of trees per unit area in a stand with a.

Stand relative density = ∑(Tree relative density) Tree relative density = ƒ (Tree diameter and species) I n d i v i d u a l t r e e r e l a t i v e d e n s i t y i n c e n t a c r s Stout and Nyland   Stand density index (SDI) has been used in past strategic-scale fire hazard assessments for determining relative stand density (Vissage and Miles, ; USDA Forest Service, ).

SDI was first proposed by Reineke () as a stand density assessment tool based on size-density relationships observed in fully stocked pure or nearly pure stands.

diameter, volume, nutrient availability, stand density, carbon, photosynthesis, Pseudotsuga menziesii, stable isotopes Abstract: The objectives of this study were (i) to provide further evidence of a positive correlation of stand density with early growth of coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.).

Stand basal area is widely used in the management of even-aged stands for a number of reasons, viz. it is a practical index of stand density; it is easily measured; it is the natural base for deriving stand volume; and volume increment and basal area increment are usually well correlated.

Retention levels (low and high density) were calculated using the upper limit of stand density for Douglas-fir (Reineke ) and the principles of stand density management described by Long (. if measurements of stand density, quadratic mean diam-eter (DBHq), age, and top-height are known (fig.

5). The three required variables for the user to enter are stand age, density, and DBHq. The model computes stand top-height and, based on the entered stand age, site index.

An average spacing and basal area is computed. An indica.In the additive design, Douglas-fir and western redcedar were planted at a density of tph (with the two species planted in equal proportions at alternating planting spots), and one of eight "broadleaf" density treatments was subsequently applied to randomly selected plots.where SDI = Reineke’s stand-density index N = trees/ha Dq = quadratic mean diameter (cm) b = exponent of Reineke’s equation, often reported to equal It is obvious that whether one uses N and Dq in metric or English units a different value of SDI will be obtained.